What has happened to the: Ole’ Negro Soul

The Black church wasn’t founded on the grounds of discrimination, religious intolerance, hate and false ideologies. No! It was founded in a time of despair, in a time of racial segregation, racial intolerance, limited education, limited funds, and separation.

The Black Church Ole’ Negro Soul was birth in the fields own by slave masters that was attended by Negro’s who were not worth a penny. We were sold, made fools of, raped, killed, lynched, beaten, given little food, considered property and separated from our families. What kept us together was unity, faith in a God bigger than us and hope. As we worked those fields, cleaned houses, called “niggers”, and endured true slavery- we sang what are called Ole’ Negro songs, about God and how our future generations would have it better. They didn’t kill each other like we’re doing. Our Black Brothers are killing each other. Brother vs. Brother. We’re doing what was done to us by the police, masters and society and killing one another.

The Ole’ Negro prayers birth leaders like MLK, who fought discrimination and hate with peace. Fought injustice with the power of education, and knowing our God given rights. I am only four generations away from slavery. It wasn’t that long ago, my ancestors were praying for my future, my parents future, and grandparents future. No!

The Black church was a place that taught politics, taught each other how to read, empowered one another, prayed and ate together. Under pressure, under fire, facing and accepting the realization that death was at our door; we kept on moving. The first book we were taught to read was the bible, the truth of God, and each story with a negative beginning had a powerful end. The greats was the birth of Jesus, who came with “Good news.” The church was a place of where we cried out to Jesus with our boisterous voice, dance in praise, spoke in unknown tongues and spoke life for a better generation.

The Ole’ Negro Soul- gave birth to leaders like W. E. B Du Bois, leaders like Malcolm X, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The voice of writers like Zora Neal Hurston, Alice Walker, Dr. Maya Angelou, Langston Hughes. The songs of singers like Ella Fitzgerald, Josephine Baker, and Mahalia Jackson. The Ole’ Negro soul, knew we would have a African American President. John Lewis, Oprah Winfrey, Toni Morrison, Earl Stafford, Dr. Sheryl W. Barnes, Revend King, Pastor Martha V. Green (local affluent black leaders) T.D Jakes, Condelezza Rice and so much more. My mayor: Toni Harp. These African American people are still fighting for our voices, rights and believing in out abilities. We have to keep the fight.

To my brothers and sisters lets not forget about our history, the four black girls killed and how the community came together. The fight to vote, police beatings, dogs biting our youth, unable to attend school, burned churches and burdened hearts. Lets not forget where we come from! Lets be the change we are demanding from our government. Let’s take office, lets vote, attend town hall meetings, turn off the tv and listen to the presidential address. Stay focus. Even in our music we’ve lost our voice. Our woman were raped, shamed and beaten naked, and abused, we’ve forgotten where we come from, and show our privates, “twerk” doing everything we were once forced to do. BET wasn’t founded on that, but I do believe it’s forgotten it’s roots and now we rap about drugs, killings, sex, money instead of building our community.

Historically Black Colleges/Universities are so expensive because after we graduate no one will donate back into the institutions making it hard for brothers and sisters to attend. Some have become so prestigious that we pick through tests created against the minority community to determine if you are good enough for an education. EVERY ONE HAS A RIGHT TO EDUCATION. Why are we making it so hard for our brothers and sisters, trying to make a difference. We deny them access, and so much many won’t apply because they don’t feel like they’re Howard material, Spellman worthy or Morehouse worthiness.

Where is the Ole’ Negro Soul? I think of our older generations the ones that are dying off, we need to take heed to their word, listen to their testimonies and use their passion and start a new revolution, built on our truths and faith. The generations that fought, walked and marched. We’ve forgotten where we’ve come from and confirmed to a world that is not right. We are killing one another, hating one another, relying on government handouts and destroying ourselves with words, guns and lies. Where is that Ole’ Negro Soul, who fought to stay together.

Don’t forget our history, our fights, our dreams, our voice and who helped made it a reality. What do you think Dr. Martin Luther King would say if he saw us today? It’s not enough to have a black president. It starts at home, in our communities and schools. Take charge, for yourself, your children for our God! I can’t speak for other races, I can only speak for mine. But every race needs to stick true to there roots and progress.

What has happened to the Ole’ Negro Soul?

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